Job search

6 tips for looking for a job at 55

Looking for a job is no easy task, even more so at an advanced age! How do you find a job when you’re approaching the third third of your career? Six tips to help you get there.

1. Taking stock

After losing a job, self-esteem is often at its lowest. It is important to assess your skills, determine your talents, interests, desires, and the responsibilities you want to have before you begin the last third of your career. “The first thing to do is to take stock of your skills and experiences. Thanks to these various tests, we can better target the expectations and desires of job seekers,” says Murielle Lafond, Transition and Career Management Advisor at Midi Quarante, a non-profit organization specializing in the placement of people aged 40 and over in Laval.

2. Updating the CV

The CV is the first contact with an employer. It is therefore essential that it is up to date and that it stands out. “It must be targeted according to the position sought and linked to the skills and experience of the last 15 to 20 years. We emphasize everything the person can offer at his or her age,” says Ms. Lafond. It’s important to use the words of the current market to show that you’re not out of date,” she recommends. Don’t hesitate to indicate your most recent training, it will show that you have kept up to date. “Often that’s the key. The employer thinks the person is up to date,” notes Hédia Annabi, an employment counsellor and trainer at Centre Eureka, which specializes in job search for people 40 and over in Montreal.

READ  Job seekers: what skills should we be banking on in 2018?
3. Take care of the presentation

Presentation is an important asset to master in an interview. “Job seekers are taught to defuse age bias and present themselves in a way that reassures the employer,” explains Murielle Lafond. At both the Centre Midi Quarante and the Centre Eureka, we value the use of simulated filmed interviews. “The person can correct their attitude and behaviour,” explains Hédia Annabi. She also reminds us that more and more employers are using simulations during interviews. “Memorized answers no longer work. You have to be prepared,” she adds.

4. Working on the mental and physical state

Like an athlete, a healthy lifestyle is essential to stay active and alert. You must also have mourned your previous job before meeting employers. If you carry this burden, it will be reflected in interviews,” says Hédia Annabi. Studies have shown that optimism may be the key to getting a job. »

And self-confidence is something you have to work on. Sometimes simply by targeting desires and expectations, self-esteem comes back. “When the CV is completed, a sense of pride is evident,” adds Murielle Lafond of Midi Quarante.

5. Reassure the employer

Slightly white temples and wrinkles tend to scare some employers. So you’ll have to put yourself forward and show that you are an added value to the company. “Some employers are scared, they’re dealing with a mature person. You have to reassure them and tell them where you see yourself in 5 or 10 years,” advises Murielle Lafond. “Expertise, maturity, self-confidence, punctuality, stability… That’s what you bring to the employer,” adds Hédia Annabi.

READ  Looking for a job: how can you get motivated for the new school year?
6. Activate your network

Networking, being around people in the same situation as you: this will help you see that you are not alone in this situation. “It’s a way to support yourself morally and to break the isolation. We’ve created a networking program that allows our job seekers to track positions or exchange contacts,” says the Midi Quarante counsellor. Let your network know the type of position you’re looking for and scan for job offers. Word-of-mouth is often a good resource.

Above all, don’t lose sight of the fact that your experience is an asset and that discipline, optimism, determination and organization will be your best allies in this return-to-work process.

Tags
Back to top button
Close